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KNEE REPLACEMENT

Knee joint replacement

Description

Damaged cartilage and bone are removed from the knee joint. Man-made pieces are then placed in the knee.

Knee joint replacement prosthesis

These pieces may be placed in the following places in the knee joint:

  • Lower end of the thigh bone. This bone is called the femur. The replacement part is usually made of metal.
  • Upper end of the shin bone, which is the large bone in your lower leg. This bone is called the tibia. The replacement part is usually made from metal and a strong plastic.
  • Back side of your kneecap. Your kneecap is called the patella. The replacement part is usually made from a strong plastic.

You will not feel any pain during the surgery. You will have 1 of these 2 types of anesthesia:

  • General anesthesia. This means you will be asleep and unable to feel pain.
  • Regional (spinal or epidural) anesthesia. Medicine is put into your back to make you numb below your waist. You will also get medicine to make you sleepy. And you may get medicine that will make you forget about the procedure, even though you are not fully asleep.

After you receive anesthesia, your surgeon will make a cut over your knee to open it up. This cut is often 8 to 10 inches long. Then your surgeon will:

  • Move your kneecap (patella) out of the way, then cut the ends of your thigh bone and shin (lower leg) bone to fit the replacement part.
  • Cut the underside of your kneecap to prepare it for the new pieces that will be attached there.
  • Fasten the 2 parts of the prosthesis to your bones. One part will be attached to the end of your thigh bone and the other part will be attached to your shin bone. The pieces can be attached using bone cement or screws.
  • Attach the underside of your kneecap. A special bone cement is used to attach this part.
  • Repair your muscles and tendons around the new joint and close the surgical cut.

The surgery takes about 2 hours.

Most artificial knees have both metal and plastic parts. Some surgeons now use different materials, including metal on metal, ceramic on ceramic, or ceramic on plastic.

Mark Klion
Dr. Mark Klion Orthopedic Surgeon New York, New York
Michael Maynard
Dr. Michael Maynard Orthopedic Surgeon New York, New York
Christopher Dodson
Dr. Christopher Dodson Orthopedic Surgeon Bensalem, Pennsylvania
James Paci
Dr. James Paci Orthopedic Surgeon East Setauket, New York
David Sohn
Dr. David Sohn Orthopedic Surgeon Toledo, Ohio
Riley Williams
Dr. Riley Williams Orthopedic Surgeon New York, New York
VoyagerMed doctors that match your search
Mark Klion
Dr. Mark Klion Orthopedic Surgeon New York, New York
Michael Maynard
Dr. Michael Maynard Orthopedic Surgeon New York, New York
Christopher Dodson
Dr. Christopher Dodson Orthopedic Surgeon Bensalem, Pennsylvania
James Paci
Dr. James Paci Orthopedic Surgeon East Setauket, New York
David Sohn
Dr. David Sohn Orthopedic Surgeon Toledo, Ohio
Riley Williams
Dr. Riley Williams Orthopedic Surgeon New York, New York